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JUHANI AHVENJÄRVI

CLAES ANDERSSON

EVA-STINA BYGGMÄSTAR

TOMAS MIKAEL BÄCK

AGNETA ENCKELL

MARTIN ENCKELL

TUA FORSSTRÖM

PENTTI HOLAPPA

JOUNI INKALA

RIINA KATAJAVUORI

JYRKI KIISKINEN

TOMI KONTIO

JUKKA KOSKELAINEN

LEEVI LEHTO

HEIDI LIEHU

RAKEL LIEHU

LAURI OTONKOSKI

MARKKU PAASONEN

ANNUKKA PEURA

MIRKKA REKOLA

HENRIKA RINGBOM

PENTTI SAARITSA

HELENA SINERVO

EIRA STENBERG

ANNI SUMARI

ILPO TIIHONEN

SIRKKA TURKKA

MERJA VIROLAINEN

KJELL WESTÖ (ANDERS HED)

JOUNI INKALA (b. 1966) is writer living in Helsinki. He has published seven collections of poems, the latest of which, Sarveisaikoja , appeared in 2005.
THE REVERENT WITNESS OF MEANINGFUL MOMENTS
 

Behind the window, wet snowflakes rise and descend,
cold white insects.
In the summer, their brothers swirled in the sun's low,
silent volleys,

as I sped on my bicycle through the dark gullet of spruce-rows
some always filtered into my eyes, my mouth.

They were cool, even then.

Now I sacrifice toenails, relinquish some of my own warmth
to the back of an armchair.

As a dark, painful spot in God's brain,
which is unknown

as long as it isn't troubled into truth,
pain made visible, known.

As if starting with me.
Easily, evolution leaves my toes. Hard, curved wings
clicking down to the floor,
hurtle through room space until I gather
them,
squeeze painful solid time tighter in my fist.
They tell me that I exist, that I am about to become,
ever-repeating symbols,
where l'm going now.

I open the window, a cold wedge falls into the room,
slants into my lap, casts its sign of the cross on my forehead,
my belly, my right and left shoulder.

I am being cared for, terribly.
I open the easy prayer of my fist and throw.

The toenails fly out among the flakes, perhaps
soon to notice how puny the freedom they're leaving.


Bright water beads

Behind the window

Deep gouges in the middle of the...

Then you started explaining again

I can not sleep even though I...

The weight of November's damp fog

This afternoon, I cut my finger

The next psalm after the last

Confession in wedding garb


 
From Tässä sen reuna (The Edge Here), 1992. 
Translated by Anselm Hollo.