SUOMEKSI | SVENSKA | ENGLISH | FRANÇAIS | DEUTSCH | ESPAÑOL | ITALIANO

JUHANI AHVENJÄRVI

CLAES ANDERSSON

EVA-STINA BYGGMÄSTAR

TOMAS MIKAEL BÄCK

AGNETA ENCKELL

MARTIN ENCKELL

TUA FORSSTRÖM

PENTTI HOLAPPA

JOUNI INKALA

RIINA KATAJAVUORI

JYRKI KIISKINEN

TOMI KONTIO

JUKKA KOSKELAINEN

LEEVI LEHTO

HEIDI LIEHU

RAKEL LIEHU

LAURI OTONKOSKI

MARKKU PAASONEN

ANNUKKA PEURA

MIRKKA REKOLA

HENRIKA RINGBOM

PENTTI SAARITSA

HELENA SINERVO

EIRA STENBERG

ANNI SUMARI

ILPO TIIHONEN

SIRKKA TURKKA

MERJA VIROLAINEN

KJELL WESTÖ (ANDERS HED)

JUKKA KOSKELAINEN (b. 1961) first collection of poems, Kierros (Cycle) was published in 1995. Since that he has published two more, Erään taistelun kuvaus (Description of a Certain Battle, 1997), Niin lavastetaan lännen taivas (Thus We Stage the Western Sky, 2001) and Mitä et sano (2005). In addition to these works he has published a collection of essays and several translations of poems, by Octavio Paz and Paul Celan among others. Koskelainen was awarded Eino Leino Prize in 1992, Kalevi Jäntti Prize in 1995 and Einari Vuorela Prize in 2000.
THE WHIRLING LAYERS OF THE BYGONE
A Sketch for Aphoristic Poetry 

The edge of the empire is its most important part. The edge slips easily, 
  but you can say it's right here. Guns must be kept in their holsters. 
Lead-blue zinc waves boom ahead of us once again,
  I believe you grasp the image. The stream brings in driftwood, seashells 
  and sediment, that is, everything I put into my lines. A good turn. 
Last year you wrote, from the other side: you're a lot like me,
  I didn't understand a word. Since then I've been searching for an image
  to reflect distance: foam that washes away my traces, trembling of the horizon, 
  ocean galloping to the rhythm of ancient meters? But it just isn't right. 
And how to describe a memory of a meeting (a close range at last): a raven 
  flaps its wings fiercely in a cave, the traces of a campfire against the aurora, 
  an actor hollering the lines of Hamlet alone on the beach...
But the ocean is leading a life of its own: it isn't a stage of any drama of passions 
  or a counterpart for an abandoned soul, not even when the stars are tingling 
  loudly, again, a rabbit is run over by a car. 
Still I went through something completely different when I had to run down 
  the fire ladder and someone ran behind me but didn't reach me or when someone
  stopped to stare at me on Broadway. 
  Although I keep talking about the feminine gender, I didn't make a single gesture, 
  I stayed behind wondering about the grip of religions, in general, that is. 
And it is said that the tongue clinks on its own, it's covered with a skein of knots 
  and every secured sentence is just a rusting lid over a swarming gorge. 
  But something pierces through: an odd feeling that the midriff comprehends more than 
  the brain;
the empire is a landmark just like a self-exalted old pagan god 
  that has been moved out of the way. Even I function like a machine. Every stimulus
  kindles me. 
Can you still hear me? I already said that the edge escapes easily, you can't 
  see the same landscape as yesterday, you can't start explaining it now.


Now

A Sketch for Aphoristic Poetry

Nocturnal Prayer

At Dinner Time

now you're here

...can't you see the change in...

Today, too

The Southern Cross

The traveller

Ultramar

The swords

After the dream

Unknown author

Ringroad Elegy


 
From Erään taistelun kuvaus(Description of a Certain Battle), 1997. 
Translated by Sarka Hantula.